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Division of Chemical Toxicology

The mission of the Division is to improve human health and public welfare by promoting the understanding of chemical mechanisms that govern disease processes and the toxicity of drugs, environmental agents, and endogenous chemicals. This will be accomplished by (1) providing a forum for communicating research in the field of chemical toxicology; (2) encouraging further research into chemical mechanisms of toxicity; (3) providing a rigorous scientific basis for risk assessment; (4) providing continuing education, leadership training, and career development opportunities for our fellow chemists; and (5) sponsoring with other societies and divisions, symposia and other programs of mutual interest.

Division of Chemical Toxicology News

SUNDAY

Morning

Chemical Research in Toxicology, Young Investigators Symposium

  • Yinsheng Wang, Univ of California, Riverside. Targeted quantitative proteomic approaches for interrogating the human kinome
  • Kent Gates, Univ of Missouri.  Sequence-specific covalent capture for detection of disease-derived nucleic acid sequences
  • Jin Zhang, Univ of California, San Diego.  Dynamic visualization of signaling molecules in living cells
  • Huiwang Ai, Chemical Research in Toxicology, Young Investigator  Award Winner, Univ of California, Riverside.  Seeing is believing: Fluorescent biosensors for redox signaling and oxidative stress

Afternoon

Founders’ Award Symposium

  • F. Peter Guengerich, Vanderbilt Univ.  Biochemical and toxicological applications of mass spectrometry
  • Trevor Penning, Univ of Pennsylvania.  Human aldo-keto reductases and aryl hydrocarbon activation
  • Larry Marnett, Vanderbilt Univ.  Chemical biology of DNA damage by α,β-unsaturated aldehydes
  • Steve Tannenbaum, MIT.  S-Nitrosation is a systems-wide regulatory process
  • Ian Blair, Founders’ Award Winner, Univ of Pennsylvania.  Systems pharmacology approach to the study of mitochondrial dysfunction

MONDAY

Morning

TOXI Young Investigators Symposium

Afternoon

Biological Targets of Botanical Supplements. Organizer Judy Bolton

  • Richard van Breemen, Univ of Illinois, at Chicago, Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Licorice Botanical Dietary Supplements Used by Menopausal Women
  • Mary F. Paine, Washington State Univ, Intestinal UGTs as targets for pharmacokinetic natural product-drug interactions
  • Tom Kensler, Johns Hopkins. KEAP1 and done? Targeting the NRF2 pathway with sulforaphane
  • Cynthia Rider, NIEHS, Biological Endpoints versus Chemistry in Determining Sufficient Similarity of Botanical Dietary Supplements
  • Judy Bolton, Univ of Illinois, at Chicago, Botanicals modulate estrogen metabolism through multiple targets

Evening

SCI-MIX

TUESDAY

Morning

Crosslink DNA repair. Organizers, Yinsheng Wang and Orlando Scharer

  • Johannes Walter, Harvard Medical School, Mechanisms of replication-coupled repair
  • Kent Gates, Univ. of Missouri, Interstrand cross-links derived from abasic sites in duplex DNA
  • Yinsheng Wang, Univ. of California, Riverside, Occurrence, Replication and repair of DNA interstrand cross-link lesions in human cells.
  • Michael Seidman,NIH/NIA, Baltimore, Lesion proximal FANCD2 is required for replication independent repair of interstrand crosslinks.
  • Xiaohua Peng, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Hydrogen Peroxide Activated DNA Cross-Linking Agents and Their Biomedical Application
  • Lei Li , MD Anderson, Fanconi Anemia pathway and Constitutive Protection of Replication Stress

Afternoon

Toxicological Considerations in Antibody Drug Conjugate Design and Development, Organizers, Fred Guengerich, Nick Meanwell and Griff Humphries

  • Pamela A. Trail, Regeneron, Antibody drug conjugates: design considerations for improving efficacy and safety.
  • Donglu Zhang, Genentech, Antibody drug conjugates: design considerations for improving efficacy and safety
  • Omar  Ahmad, Pfizer, Linker Immolation and Cell Killing Activity
  • Peter Senter, Seattle Genetics, ADME Considerations for the Development of Antibody-Drug Conjugates

Evening

Keynote Lecture

  • Paul B Watkins, Univ of North Carolina, Understanding hepatoxicity: man to mouse to computer

POSTER SESSION

TOXI Buisness Meeting

Student and Post-doc Awards

WEDNESDAY

Morning

General Oral Papers

Afternoon

Mass Spectrometry applications in RNA toxicology. Organizer Silvia Balboa

  • Jonathan Josephs,  ThermoFisher Scientific, Advances in mass spectrometry techniques for metabolism, pharmacology and toxicology
  • Peter Nemes,   George Washington Univ.  Capillary Electrophoresis for Trace-level Detection: Metabolites and Proteins.
  • Benedikt Warth, Univ of Vienna, Exposing the Exposome: Utilizing global metabolomics to characterize toxicant exposure and effect.
  • Balasubrahmanyam Addepalli, Univ of Cincinnati, Probing stress-induced effects on RNA and posttranscriptional modifications by LC-MS.
  • Jingshu Guo, Univ. of Minnesota, Advances in human biomonitoring of heterocyclic aromatic amines by high resolution accurate mass spectrometry

Registration is open for ACS Meeting in Washington DC

254th Meeting of the American Chemical Society
Washington, DC
August 20-24, 2017

Theme: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy

capitol
abraham-and-his-legacy
Visit the ACS Website to Register for the meeting, and to obtain Housing.

Early Registration ends July 10. 

Presenters, be sure to visit the Presenter’s Tip Page

Travel Assistance Awards

The Division of Chemical Toxicology (TOXI) will make available Travel Assistance Awards to undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. The awards of approximately $750 will reimburse travel and hotel costs for the National ACS meeting in Washington DC this August (receipts will be required). Applications will be awarded on the basis of financial need, scientific merit, and diversity factors. Preference will be given to first-time attendees.

All students and postdocs who are members or affiliates of TOXI and who have submitted an abstract for the National ACS meeting in Philadelphia are eligible to apply.

The application should consist of a single pdf file containing:

  1. A nomination letter from the faculty advisor or laboratory director. The letter should explain why Travel Assistance Award funds are needed.
  2. A curriculum vitae for the applicant.
  3. The abstract for the work to be presented by the nominee at the meeting.

Applications are due to treasurer Natalia Tretyakova  by June 1, 2017.

Huiwang Ai
Huiwang Ai

Huiwang Ai, of the University of California, Riverside has won the sixth annual Chemical Research in Toxicology -Young Investigators Award.  He joins past winners Yinsheng Wang,   Dean Naisbitt, Shana Sturla, Penny Beuning, and Yimon Aye.

Huiwang Ai’s  research  focuses on the engineering of novel molecular probes to peer
into cells and brains to understand their communications. He uses a collection of innovative techniques, such as protein engineering and fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, to dissect signaling pathways involving redox-active molecules, neuromodulators, and protein post-translational modifications.

Huiwang will receive his award at a symposium during the Division of Chemical Toxicology Program at the American Chemical Society’s National Meeting this August in Washington DC.

blair-ia-photo-2014Ian A. Blair has won the 2017 Founders’ Award from the Division of Chemical Toxicology of the American Chemical Society.  Dr Blair has made outstanding contributions to the field of Chemical Toxicology.  He has pioneered the use of mass spectrometry to identify biomarkers for carcinogenesis, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegeneration.  He developed  electron capture atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, which makes it possible to conduct quantitative analyses on chiral biomolecules. See his current research interests on his lab website.  Also read an interview from Francesca Lake in Future Science OA.

Dr Blair will receive the Award, during a Symposium, in his honor, in August at the American Chemicals Society’s National Meeting

Chair ElectShana Sturla

Shana Sturla will be Chair Elect in 2017-2018 and Chair in 2019-2020. She is an Associate Professor at ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The main goal of her research is to understand the chemical basis of mutagenesis and toxicity. Her lab delineates relationships between chemical structures, enzyme-catalyzed chemical transformations, and cellular responses to environmental and dietary toxicants and cancer drugs.

 

 

Treasurer Elect

Michael P. Stone. will be Treasurer-Elect in 2017 and Treasure in 2018-2019. Mike is Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry at Vanderbilt University. Prof. Stone’s research expertise is in the chemistry and structural biology of DNA damage, including DNA cross-linking, and involving human exposures to aflatoxins, a,ß-unsaturated aldehydes, styrene and butadiene, aryl amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The Stone lab utilizes both NMR spectroscopy and crystallography for structural determinations.

 

 

Nominations Committee

Stephen Hecht

Stephen S Hecht, PhD will be on the Nominations Committee from 2017 to 2019. He will be Chair of the Committee in 2019. Steve is Wallin Land Grant Professor of Cancer Prevention at the University of Minnesota. He is an internationally recognized expert on carcinogens in tobacco products and their mechanisms of action. He is the co-discoverer of tobacco-specific nitrosamines, important causative agents for tobacco-induced cancer. His laboratory developed the NNAL biomarker of tobacco carcinogen exposure, crucial in establishing secondhand smoke as a lung carcinogen in non-smokers. His current research focuses on the relationship of human carcinogen and toxicant metabolites and DNA adducts to cancer risk.

 

 

Executive Committee Member-at-largeNicholas Meanwell

Nicholas A. Meanwell will be Member-at-Large from 2017-2019. Nick is Executive Director in the Department of Discovery Chemistry and Molecular Technologies at Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development. He has led drug discovery programs in the cardiovascular, neurosciences and virology therapeutic areas, work that has resulted in the advancement of 30 clinical candidates that includes temsavir/fostemsavir for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir, marketed as DaklinzaTM, and the HCV NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir, marketed as SunvepraTM.

 

 

CounselorSilvia Balboa

Silvia Balbo will be Councillor from 2017-2019. She is an Assistant Professor of the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. Her work focuses on studying mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis, in particular those related to alcohol and tobacco exposures. She is developing accurate methods to quantify the genotoxic effects deriving from these exposures and to measure the corresponding DNA damage. She is drawing upon her expertise in organic synthesis, analytical chemistry, cell culture and molecular epidemiology to develop integrated approaches aiming at characterizing DNA damage samples collected in clinical trials and molecular epidemiology studies.

 

 

Alternate-CouncilorGrover Miller

Grover P Miller will be Alternate Councilor fro 2017-2019. He is Associate Professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. His research spans experimental and computational approaches to assess metabolic activation and detoxification of drugs, pollutants, and dietary compounds from the perspective of a chemist.

Chair Elect

The responsibilities of the Chair-Elect are to attend the annual leadership conferences for officers, to pay particular attention to programming issues within the Division, and to assist the Chair as may be requested by that individual. It is also the responsibility of the Chair-Elect to preside at meetings of the Executive Committee when the Chair is absent. Most importantly, the Chair-Elect will become Chair in 2019.

Shana SturlaShana Sturla received a B.S. (Chemistry) in 1996 from the University of California at Berkeley, and a Ph.D. (Organic Chemistry) in 2001 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she worked under the direction of Stephen Buchwald.  Under the guidance of Stephen Hecht, she was a postdoctoral fellow of the National Cancer Institute and of the American Chemical Society at the University of Minnesota Cancer Center, and in 2004 became an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota.  Her work there was recognized with an NIH Career Development Award and, as a Dominican American, she received an American Association for Cancer Research Minority Scholar in Cancer Research Award.  In 2009, she joined the faculty of the ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, as Associate Professor with tenure and received a European Research Council Grant, a prestigious award supporting frontier research in all disciplines.  She received the 2014 Young Investigator Award for Chemical Research in Toxicology, and in 2015 was promoted to Full Professor of Toxicology at the ETH, and became Vice President of the Swiss Society of Toxicology. The main goal of her research is to understand the chemical basis of mutagenesis and toxicity.  Her lab delineates relationships between chemical structures, enzyme-catalyzed chemical transformations, and cellular responses to environmental and dietary toxicants and cancer drugs.  She has served the TOXI division in various ways from organizing sessions to member-at-large to serving as the program chair in 2011 and 2012; She is a member of the Chemical Research in Toxicology editorial advisory board, has been a guest editor for Systems Toxicology issues.

Treasurer Elect

Michael P. Stone.  Born August 23,1955, Berkeley, CA.  B.S. Biochemistry, University of California, Davis, 1977; Ph.D, Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, 1981; post-doctoral, Department of Chemistry, The University of Rochester, 1981-84; Faculty, Vanderbilt University, 1984-present, currently Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry.  Prof. Stone’s research expertise is in the chemistry and structural biology of DNA damage, including DNA cross-linking, and involving human exposures to aflatoxins, a,b-unsaturated aldehydes, styrene and butadiene, aryl amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The Stone lab utilizes both NMR spectroscopy and crystallography for structural determinations.  Prof. Stone has published 130+ peer-reviewed publications.  At Vanderbilt University, Prof. Stone has taught general chemistry, analytical chemistry, and physical chemistry. He directs the Structural Biology Core Facility of an NIEHS P30 Center in Molecular Toxicology. Prof. Stone serves on the Editorial Board of Chemical Research in Toxicology.  He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Chemical Society, The Biophysical Society, and Sigma Xi.

Nominations Committee

 

Stephen S Hecht, PhD is an internationally recognized expert on carcinogens in tobacco products and their mechanisms of action.  He is the co-discoverer of tobacco-specific nitrosamines, important causative agents for tobacco-induced cancer.  His laboratory developed the NNAL biomarker of tobacco carcinogen exposure, crucial in establishing secondhand smoke as a lung carcinogen in non-smokers. His current research focuses on the relationship of human carcinogen and toxicant metabolites and DNA adducts to cancer risk.

He has a B.S.in chemistry (Duke University) and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry (MIT).  Prior to moving to the University of Minnesota in 1996, he conducted research at the American Health Foundation in Valhalla, NY, where he was Director of Research from 1987-1996.

Stephen HechtHe received the AACR Award for Excellence in Cancer Prevention Research in 2006, and the Founders Award from the Division of Chemical Toxicology, American Chemical Society in 2009.  He was elected an American Chemical Society Fellow in 2009, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2014, and selected as the Editor-in-Chief of Chemical Research in Toxicology in 2012.  He has been the recipient of a Merit Award and an Outstanding Investigator Grant from the National Cancer Institute, and an American Cancer Society Research Professorship. He has published over 800 papers in the scientific literature.

Executive Committee Member-at-large

Nicholas A. Meanwell received his B.Sc. (1976) and Ph.D. (1979) degrees from the Nicholas MeanwellUniversity of Sheffield, England and conducted post-doctoral studies at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.  In 1982, he joined Bristol-Myers Squbb Research and Development where he is currently an Executive Director in the Department of Discovery Chemistry and Molecular Technologies.  He has led drug discovery programs in the cardiovascular, neurosciences and virology therapeutic areas, work that has resulted in the advancement of 30 clinical candidates that includes temsavir/fostemsavir for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir, marketed as DaklinzaTM, and the HCV NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir, marketed as SunvepraTM.  He is the author/co-author of 210 publications, review articles and book chapters and more than 180 meeting abstracts and is named as an inventor/co-inventor of 118 issued U.S. Patents.  He has presented over 100 invited lectures at National and International meetings, Universities and Schools on Medicinal Chemistry and has organized/co-organized/presided of over 30 sessions at National and International Meetings, ACS Webinars in Drug Discovery, ACS Prospectives Meetings and Short Courses.

He was admitted as a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering in February, 2014, was the co-recipient of a PhRMA Research and Hope Award for Biopharmaceutical Industry Research, 2014 for outstanding research in the area of HIV/AIDS, the recipient of the 2015 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship Award administered jointly by the ACS Division of Medicinal Chemistry and the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and he was inducted into the ACS Division of Medicinal Chemistry Hall of Fame on August 18th, 2015.

Counselor

Silvia Balbo got her M.S. and Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Torino Silvia Balboa(Italy) in 2006, doing part of her doctoral thesis work at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium). She then joined IARC in Lyon (France) as a post-doctoral fellow under the supervision of Dr Paolo Boffetta. In 2008, Silvia moved to Minneapolis (MN) to join as a post-doctoral fellow the lab of Dr Stephen Hecht. Silvia is now an Assistant Professor of the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. She is part of the Division of Environmental Health Science and member of the Masonic Cancer Center. Her work focuses on studying mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis, in particular those related to alcohol and tobacco exposures. She is developing accurate methods to quantify the genotoxic effects deriving from these exposures and to measure the corresponding DNA damage. She is drawing upon her expertise in organic synthesis, analytical chemistry, cell culture and molecular epidemiology to develop integrated approaches aiming at characterizing DNA damage samples collected in clinical trials and molecular epidemiology studies.

Alternate Counselor

Grover P Miller earned Chemistry and Biochemistry BS degrees from Louisiana State Univ Grover Miller (1992) and a PhD under Stephen J. Benkovic from Penn State Univ (1997). He pursued postdoctoral research under F. Peter Guengerich at Vanderbilt Univ and earned an NIH NRSA Award. In 2001, he joined the Univ of Ark for Medical Sciences and rose to Assoc Prof in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2007) and Medical Bioinformatics (2016). He teaches medical, graduate, and undergraduate students about protein chemistry, enzymology, xenobiotic metabolism, and scientific communication. His research spans experimental and computational approaches to assess metabolic activation and detoxification of drugs, pollutants, and dietary compounds from the perspective of a chemist. He has delivered 25 invited lectures, published 42 journal articles, and authored 2 US patents. He serves on 3 editorial boards including World J Method, Drug Metab Dispos, and Drug Metab Rev. He served on 17 study sections including those for Amer Heart Assoc, Czech Sci Fdn, Austrian Sci Fund, La EPSCOR, TRI Pilot Fund (UAMS), Enhancement Grant for Res Pgm (Sam Houston State Univ), Universidad de Puerto Rico-Río Piedras Inst Res Fund, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as well as chairing 4 Study Sections for the Amer Heart Assoc.  He also chaired sessions at Regional (2008) and Natl ACS meetings (2014). Locally, he served as ACS Section Secretary (2011-2), Chair-Elect (2013), and Chair (2014-5) as well as Chair of Program (2013-4), Recruitment (2013-5), and Revision of Bylaws Committees (2011-2). In recognition of his efforts, he received 2 Outstanding ACS Service Awards (2011-2012).

Congratulations to Kent Gates , on being named to the 2016 Class of ACS Fellows.

Kent is widely recognized for investigations of the chemical mechanisms underlying

Kent Gates
Kent Gates, ACS Fellow, Class of 2016

DNA damage by a number of structurally interesting antitumor natural products. He is currently Schlundt Professor of Chemistry at the University of Missouri

Kent served as Program Chair for the Division of Chemical Toxicology of the ACS, 2006-2008

See ACS Web Site  for other fellows

I’d like to introduce you to our new website design.  There are three new aspects:

  • The website will automatically change to fit the device you’re reading it on. Therefore the site will be easily viewed on desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones.
  • We have a TOXI twitter feed that will be displayed on the site.  On the desktop, it will appear on the right.  On a smartphone, it will be on the bottom.
  • The home page is now the News.

Now add the TOXI website to you home page. Visit How to Geeks for instructions

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Contact Thomas Spratt if you would like to add another news item to this page